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PBS
Feb 8, 2013 10:00pm PST
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signof lfeast and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 11:00pm PST
to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and therefore less secure nation. >> i'm to the giving up on democracy. i don't know what the alternative is. if you say a democratic government can't solve this problem, then you are saying we need a dictatorship? i dot think s. >> rose: i'm pleased to have jay fishman at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie s so good to be here. >> rose: so just pick up on overdraft, what's the urgency? and why hasn't the government, washington responded to something that most people agree stands in the way of america's economic growth and health? >> so let me size up the issue in just a few numbers. this discussion has been lots of words, precious few numbers. the baby boom generation of which i'm a member is moving in exorrably into that 65 and older time frame, between 2000 and 2010, 55 to 64, that population group gr
PBS
Feb 4, 2013 11:00pm PST
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 5:30pm PST
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
PBS
Feb 2, 2013 11:30am PST
led her to create the post of u.s. ambassador for global women's issues. she appointed melanne verveer, a long-time aide and friend. >> well, you know, as first lady she had impact on our own policies. it was she who very much became a proponent for micro credit for women who were in the poorest circumstances being lifted up with training and small amounts of credit. girls' education. so she ha pli impacts certainly in development during those years. as senator she continued to be active on those issues. the work that went on with afghan women early in 2003 recognizing how critical they would be to the creation of a better future for afghan women. she was very involved in when she traveled as a senator. she didn't travel that much internationally, but when she did, to afghanistan or to iraq, she met wit all of theey peop, but she always asked that she also meet with some of the key women. and then as secretary, she really made these issues a cornerstone of our foreign policy, obviously, in creating the position that i have, which is the first ever u.s. ambassador for global women's iss
PBS
Feb 17, 2013 9:00am PST
>>> the first u.s. woman president. from michelle in chile to angela in germany and ellen swearingn was held on the grounds of the capitol, which just a few years ago was a battle zone in presidents and heads of states? well, according to a new cbs poll, a phenomminally hig number of americans say the would vote for a qualified woman running for president. 92%. indeed, many believe the united states has alreadyge period of time have held presidential policy. so, is america now ready for u.s. president who say woman? >> we'll ask the author of the widely read and intriguing book, about the wives of american presidents, all of them titled rating the first lady's. john benjamin roberts th second. one-on-one is brought to you isy month. why don't we have a woman president in the unite states? why haven't we had one? >> i think the answer to that is simply that american women may not be ready for it. a majority of the voters ar fee may president we would probably have one. i'm being a little bit flip. the thuth is we are not a and women have not really focused on politics unti the last c
PBS
Feb 16, 2013 11:30am PST
, marcia fudge, making it the first time ohio will have two african american u.s. representatives. >> i think when we go out and young folks, women and men look to us. we're part of a history, we're part that allows, especially young girls to be able to say, i, too, can go to washington and serve in congress because there was a joyce beatty. >> beatty says a diverse congress means less gridlock, and more action. >> i think there will be some changes in the house because of the diversity of the caucus and we are more reflective of america. >> beatty is ready to resolve the differences between members of congress and believes that can only be done when both sides compromise. >> democrats are going to be democrats and republicans are going to be republicans and on many things our core is very different. i think you have to look at both sides of the equation and i think you have to come up with some resolves that are palatable for both sides of the aisle. i n't think we've spent a lot of time figuring out how we can work together. i think in the past there was too much time spent on making
PBS
Feb 17, 2013 8:30am PST
in europe or the u.s. than i did about indian history. but i went, and a whole kind of world opened up to me. >> hinojosa: when you told your parents, "mom, dad, i'm moving back," what did they say? >> it's funny, they were very supportive, ... >> hinojosa: your parents sound amazing, by the way. i mean they're, in a way... they should be held up as role models of, you know, the true american spirit, if you will. they were so open. they came from a society that was incredibly closed, and yet here they are, shaker heights, ohio, and they're... they're open to you, to your new way. i mean, that's pretty amazing. >> i think when you're an immigrant family, there are two ways my parents could have seen the logic of their lives. one way was to pay a lot of attention to the specific places you left and places you went to and to say, for example, "i left india, i came to america, america's great, india's terrible." or the reverse, you know, "i just came here to make money, but india's the true worthy country," et cetera. and to kind of cling... it's a kind of clingy attitude that a lot of immigrant
PBS
Feb 18, 2013 4:30pm PST
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. just go online to pbskidsgo.org. we have behind-the-scenes, entire episodes, and loads of brand-new games all the time. but don't just take my word for it, go, check it out for yourself. play your harmonica like you mean it! this is going to go on a long time! and i'm not sorry to do it! i love that thing! i like your hat! i like your shoes! (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening, everyone. i'm susie gharib. whether it's time or money, philanthropy or helping others, it's an investment, and americans gave more than $350 billion to charity last year. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. from everyday americans to the nation's richest people and companies, we look at what influences giving. >> susie: and we head to chicago to learn about social impact bonds funding non-profits and letting american investors change the world with their decisions. >> tom: that and more tonight on a special edition here of "n.b.r." >> susie: with the financi
PBS
Feb 20, 2013 4:30pm PST
ctric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. have you checked out "the electric company" online? go to pbskidsgo.org -- check out the games, clips, and tons more. the best part is, there's new stuff added all the time. you don't believe me? go check it out for yourself. (laughter) she stole my special skill! give it back this instant! ok, no! never! (beeping) get away, get away from me. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening i'm tom hudson. stocks fall on fresh signs that even the federal reserve isn't sure how much is enough, when it comes to boosting the economy, by buying government bonds. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. can two weaklings become strong by teaming up. that's what office depot and office max are hoping for, as they decide to merge. >> tom: and a mixed picture on housing, contractors break ground on more single family homes, but pull back on building apartments and condos. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! how much longer should the federal reserve continu
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 11:00pm PST
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
PBS
Feb 14, 2013 11:00pm PST
's been very careful to say that he rejects the idea that government is evil. i mean i just saw a u.s. senator standing on the floor of the u.s. senate talking about taming the beast. and it's like, are you a u.s. senator this is not the beast. this is the federal government of the united states of america. it's a pauling for a u.s. senator to describe the government as a beast. and i think that obama has made a very determined and conscious effort to keep saying over an over again, government is not the enemy. government is an expression of, you know, the better angels of our nature. government is our way as a society of expressing ourselves in history and historical time in action. and that's-- immensely important. >> the definition of the role of government is an ongoing theme of american politics. >> yeah, so you have people like these tea party people protesting government and then asked if they really want to give up their social security payments and they don't seem to know that that is actually part of what government is. there's a rejection of the sort of basic idea of human
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 11:00pm PST
. >> in the u.s. we've got to be able to enable long-term thinking. we've got to give institutions that are responsible the power to bring us to the next generation as opposed to tomorrow's conflicts or, you know, the conflict in a week. we've got to take what is ideaological and paralyzes us into the debatement but once somebody has power, let them lead at least for a period of time. if afterwards they get recalled by popular world so, be it. but you want a government whoever is elected to at least lead for a while so that you can progress. in europe you've got the same issues but multiplied because not only do you have it at the nation level, you have the whole construction of europe which is sort of like an unfinished building. >> where do you come down in terms of the question that europe faces and the united states faces which is there is debt. and you have to deal to debt. and but secondly, in order to create a sustainable level of trend, you have to have growth. and too much austerity inhibits growth, certainly in the short term. >> no question. so you have got to have, well
PBS
Feb 27, 2013 11:00pm PST
'm ready, coach, i'm locked in, i'm dedicated, committed for th next two years th team u.s.a. with you and whatever you need prefrom me i'm ready to do it. >> rose: here's what he said about you. roll tape. >> holy mackerel, carmelo, you're doing an interview with charlie rose. man, he's come a long way since learning how to play contesting defense for the u.s. team. but charlie, one of the great things, the things that makes carmelo such a fantastic basketball player is he's a war your, you know? he's as good a competitor as i coached in the seven years i've coached the u.s. national team. i love my relationship with him. he's multiing dimensional. he can play the three, four, or five for us. and he's a problem for anybody at all on these positions offensively. the cool thing and the great thing is he's strong enough, determined enough and smart enough to defend all three of those positions. the truly one of the great players in our game today. >> that's big coming from him. (laughs) >> rose: didn't get much bigger than that, does it? this is auy whs won t admiration of you and kobe a
PBS
Feb 4, 2013 5:30pm PST
parade tomorrow. the game was the third most- watched program in u.s. television history, despite a power outage that halted play for 34 minutes. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to the compelling story of u.s. military veteran chris kyle. iraqi insurgents once dubbed navy seal chris kile the devil of ramaddi. a man who gained a reputation as one of the deadliest snipers in u.s. military history credited with more than 150 kills. insurgents even put a five-figure bounty on his head that was never collected. last year kile recounted his life as a sharp shooter in a best-selling book american sniper. just two weeks ago he spoke of the trouble many american troops have coming home and readjusting to civilian life. >> you're vulnerable. you're doing it for the greater good. all of a sudden you don't have an identity. >> brown: on saturday 38-year-old kile and a friend 345-year-old chad littlefield were shot dead at a gun range outside fort worth texas. >> mr. kile works with people that are suffering from some issues that have been in the military. t
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 5:30pm PST
an and the future of the church, we're joined by monsignor rick hilgartner of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he's the executive director of the secretariat of divine worship. sister christine schenk, a catholic nun and executive director of future church, which calls for a more progressive church. and from rome, john allen of cnn. he covers the vatican for the network and for the "national catholic reporter." we thank you all three for being with us. john allen, i'm going to stay with you. how much of a surprise was this? >> judy, i think this was a near total shock. just to tell you how crazy it was, i was actually scheduled to have lunch with a senior vatican official, a guy who works just down the hall from the papal apartment. as of early this morning even he didn't know it was coming. as your set-up piece indicated the shock isn't the content of the decision -- benedict had hinted fairly openly that he was receptive to the idea of a pope resigning, that actually under some circumstances a pope would have an obligation t resign if he's not able to continue to rform his duties. b
PBS
Feb 20, 2013 5:30pm PST
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
PBS
Feb 20, 2013 11:00pm PST
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
PBS
Feb 25, 2013 9:00pm PST
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new yor celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and commied to doinreal and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful wor. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and
PBS
Feb 15, 2013 5:30pm PST
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
PBS
Feb 20, 2013 10:00pm PST
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 11:00pm PST
, likely methods of attack on the u.s. homela. ge body of intelligence we got by capturing khalid sheikh mohammed and putting him through enhanced inter know,rogati thers been some f.b.i. officials that said we have this information, some of the information that he divulged we had from other sources. >> well, he was telling us the truth. >> rose: but if you had the information beforehand, was it necessary? >> so we should have killed khalid sheikh mohammed? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i'm a big believer in the interrogation program. the point is -- >> rose: b i mean go ahead. >> k.s.m. was more than anybody else objected to enhanced interrogation techniques and more than anybody else provided us with key pieces of intelligence that we needed in order to defend the nation against al qaeda. >> rose: define "enhanced interrogation." >> it was a specific set of techniques that were used, applied to detainees. every one of those techniques were used on our own people in training. through our seal program, the asian program. >> rose: including waterboarding? >> including waterboarding. a t ofamer
PBS
Feb 14, 2013 9:00pm PST
of skilled policy advocates driving a remarkable turnaround that has already changed the u.s. political landscape. >> warming isn't, in fact, accelerating. in fact, there's been none for 15 years. >> hockenberry: there's christopher monckton, a big draw at these meetings, who brings the skeptics to their feet every time. >> god bless america. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior flow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the ca
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 9:00pm PST
. and it was an attempt to consolidate power and continue to centralize decision making in the u.s. house. >> a lot of conservatives are outraged by this... >> there was a fundamental dismantling here in washington of the tea party movement. i think they viewed the tea party movement as something that scared them. today what you see is, "now that we've broken you up, now you're going to do it my way." >> leadership gets rid of challenges... >> narrator: and with the election over, the deadline for the fiscal cliff was less than two months away. boehner made the first move. >> they wanted to get a card out there and put it down quickly. so they prepared a speech and went through 18 drafts. it was tinkered with right there on the teleprompter up until the final moments. >> house speaker john boehner is going to be speaking to reporters. his office says he wants to talk about the fiscal cliff... >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. >> the speaker came out and acknowledged that the president won. elections have consequens, and
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 5:30pm PST
and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income taoury. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in deces. >> cau theyre locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in univers
PBS
Feb 3, 2013 10:00am PST
remained concerned. the u.s. catholic bishops said they are studying the proposal. >>> also this week, president obama made a strong push for comprehensive immigration reform this week, as did some members of the senate, who presented their own bipartisan plan. faith groups across the religious spectrum praised both efforts, saying legislation should be passed without delay. in recent months, religious leaders have led an aggressive campaign for immigration reform. >> for us, for many of us who are here, that immigration is part of a consistent life ethic that respects the human person. >>> meanwhile, as congress heard testimony on gun violence from former congresswoman gabrielle giffords and others, prominent members of the faith community continued to advocate for stricter gun laws. african-american clergy from around the country gathered in washington and ged that more attention be paid to gun violence in urban areas. in addition to stronger gun control, they lobbied for federal resources for community anti-violence programs. >> we all as clergy leaders and faith leaders expressed
PBS
Feb 10, 2013 12:30pm PST
at it in sheer political terms, this as global implications for the u.s. economy tanking as a result of this. >> you think the american people are getting fed up with this? this has been going on for years. >> and worse and worse, so that there is no planning. you have a five-year transportation bill, then a two-year transportation bill, then and nothing transportation bill. >> what does it take to make the government do the right thing? what sort of crisis? i would rather have an internal washington crisis to force them to do it than wait for a real crisis. if this were a forcing event, it would not be such a bad thing. >> but we keep having these forcing events and all that happens is that we keep waiting another three months. >> every state is going to be affected by this. >> the fall line and a conservative movement is clear here. -- fault line in the conservative movement is clear here. john boehner is warning that it would be 1 million jobs in defense cuts. at the same time, "the wall street journal" editorial pages oo-poohinthe cs. >> the cia, drones, and targeting bad guys abroad eve
PBS
Feb 24, 2013 12:30pm PST
in cyberspace. >> it is costing hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of u.s. jobs every year. >> counterterrorism expert who worked under the reagan administration, both the bushes, president clinton. the pit cyber warfare they're waiting on the united states and have been doing it for years. who has been minding the store? >> there was a bill that had been agreed to on some cybersecurity and, you may recall, that the privacy aficionado's went bonkers it is it bananas' and bonkers together. they flooded their members of congress and and it did not pass anything. meanwhile, there is not a serious person in washington of any ideology who has not known with increasing power that this is a problem. the president said he will use his executive powers to do it and for all these people on the internet, this is just like a range and there can be no regulation whatsoever. it will come back to haunt us. >> we have this huge defense establishment and we have a place in maryland where they're supposed to know about this. >> it raises a strategic question we have now really thought throug
PBS
Feb 27, 2013 5:00pm PST
.3% in february and 0.3% in march. they estimateroduction will grow. the head of the u.s. federal reserve ben bernanke has defended the central bank's policy of monetary easing. he's aiming to eliminate speculation the bank will scale back asset buying sooner than expected. bernanke testified before house of representatives lawmakers on wednesday. >> significant majority of the committee is supportive of the policies we have taken. the it strateg yet.ew review of i think we will have to do that sometime soon. we're quite comfortable we can exit in way that's both smooth and in which we provide lots of information to markets in advance so they will know what's coming and be able to anticipate it. >> bernanke referred to monetary policy in japan saying policy had been too cautious in the past. bernanke noted that the new prime ministernd his nominee for bank of japan governor will likely push for bold monetary measures to end deflation. let's get a check on the markets. tokyo share prices are trading higher today with export related stocks leading the gains. investors are feeling positive. bett
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 11:00pm PST
. the city on the other hand as a whole is, as a u.s. census bureau noted briefly, that we're growing faster than any other city in america. now forbes is says we're one of the best places to do business. and there's a lot of great stuff going on. but it going to take us time to rebuild the entire city. will you have the same exact experience in the northeast as you try to rebuild the rockaways and will you see some neighborhoods that come back faster than others and frustrations with fema getting money to the ground. the essential component is for people not to build it back like it was. to really think about what it should have always been. so for example, in concrete terms, if a school building got destroyed, instead of putting that building back and painting it like it was, build a new 21st century school. build a sustainable school, build a school system that is going to teach to knowledge-based economy. that is what we have done in new orleans because we realize that the foundations that were in place were taking us someplace where we didn't want to go. and that's why we had to reconst
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 11:00pm PST
, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first sentence of the 14th endment, great gift, the constitution gives a gift to peon my birthday, a birthday gift t makes me a citizen of the united states. >> because is with born here, no questions asked. and i think ever since, and i grew up as an immigrant kid, very much believing in america. my parents chose this place. they came here and i have been, i have this love affair with mark and its constitution and we have been trying ever since to repay the gift that it gave me. >> rose: when did you decide you wanted to be a cotitutionalcholar? >> thi in retrospect, you know, things seem obvious. but i think it was a process. i think there were three things that were key. when i was 10 years old my parents took me to see independence hall and the declaration of independence where it was drafted and the constitution. we went to the national archives. we went, hi lunch with my congressperson. and i visited mount vernon a
PBS
Feb 15, 2013 11:00pm PST
the reigns then had quite a long struggle. i think part of the whole reason that the u.s., i'm sort of an amateur student of the u.s. automobile industry. i think part of the reason that it ran into trouble was way before the 1970s. it was because the founders of those companies had relinquished the reign reins to businesspeople, not product people. >> rose: buzz as soon as you say that, i would make this observation. look what happened to ford. >> yes. >> rose: c.e.o. of ford. >> yes, yeah. >> rose: -- grew newspaper the car business, was not an engineer but was a superb manager. and grea sensibily for product. and i think-- . >> rose: yeah. >> and i think that's the element that gets missed a lot of the time. in these management turnovers. and particularly for technology company. you absolutely have to have as the guiding force of an abiding enduring technology company, a person or people at the helm who have products in their dna. >>os yeah. >> who love, who are crazed by the idea of making that thing better. >> better. >> the best. or making it better or the best or have this in
PBS
Feb 26, 2013 11:00pm PST
-- and there is an element of even the old prussian model of some degree of inctrination, and then in the mid 1,800s the u.s., you know, famously said well we want to have universal public education, it is no coincidence. >> rose: we based it on the prussian model. >> yes, these are the industrial superpowers, they had a middle class that was educated and fundamentally didn't rethink the model i talk about in the book it was discovered to me when i did some of the research, why do you always teach physics in the 12th grade and chemistry in the 11th frayed where did this come from? and it came literally from a group of ten men 120 years ag bfore the internet or dna or anything that says people should learn gentleman only i are in the tenth grade and people should learn, three years of english and have, an it hasn't change, it has been frozen there so what we are saying is, a lot of the ideas aren't new, let's personalize the instruction to the student this is what would have been the gold standard 300 years ago and even 50 years ago if you said what is the best? well personalized instruction, now could you
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 9:00pm PST
decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own politics. it very ll could he been a reerndindecion. >> narrator: the president decided to authorize the operation for sunday, may 1. >> i think that was one of the longest days that he's had as president. he said to us at the time that the minutes were feeling like hours, as we waited for the operation to begin. >> narrator: they waited for the signal that bin laden was in the compound. >> admiral mcraven provided the call sign "geronimo kia"-- "killed in action." and at that point, people kind of started to make eye contact and there was this sense of not just relief, but great pride and admiration in what had taken place. and nobody spoke until the president said to everybody around him, "looks like we got him." >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> narrator: the killing of o
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 9:00pm PST
and the u.s. attorney community did? i think you have to take a step back. over the last couple of years, we have convicted raj rajaratnam. you'll say that's an insider trading case. but it's clearly going after wall street. >> smith: but it has nothing to do with the financial crisis, the meltdown, the packaging of bad mortgages that led to the collapse that led to the recession. >> well, first of all, i think that the financial crisis, martin, is multifaceted. and what we've had is a multipronged, multifaceted spon. and it's simply a fiction to say that where crimes were committed, we didn't pursue the cases. and that's why where crimes were committed, you have more people in jail today for securities fraud, bank fraud and the like than ever before. >> smith: but no wall street executives? >> no wall street executives. >> narrator: by september 2010, senator kaufman's term was nearing its end. before leaving, he held a second oversight hearing. >> criminals on wall street must be held to account. >> ted dided he wanted to have a second hearing before he left office so that he could questio
PBS
Feb 22, 2013 11:00pm PST
to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in tora bora in 2001 when u.s. special forces more or less had him in a one square mile box. >> rose: right. >> and the eyes of the world were on him and september 11th was so fresh in everybody's mind. it was just a couple months after that. we were working on that film for a number of years, researching it, writing it and were pretty close to actually making it and then things changed. but i think we were both curious just as americans or as citizens or what have you. >> rose: what was going on there, why did it take so long. what were they doing. how, you have america, the most powerful nation on the planet and you have this guy. and ten years. an to try to kind of unpack that and take people behind the scenes and show them what it would be like to be an intel officer, tacking bin laden and bring that intel to life. >> rose: and how they did it. >> and how they did it. >> rose: so if i go to the cia i will find a young agent that looked like jessica chastain that was at the centre of this team that found -- >> well, first of all, there are som
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